American attitudes on interracial dating

, which struck down all anti-miscegenation laws remaining in 16 states.Interracial marriages have increased steadily since then.In 2013, a record-high 12% of newlyweds married someone of a different race, according to a Pew Research Center analysis of census data.(This share does not take into account the “interethnic” marriages between Hispanics and non-Hispanics, which we covered in an earlier report on intermarriage.) Looking beyond newlyweds, 6.3% of all marriages were between spouses of different races in 2013, up from less than 1% in 1970.For Asians, the gender pattern goes in the opposite direction: Asian women are much more likely than Asian men to marry someone of a different race.

Because they were the majority American population, whites in the study usually chose marrying someone of their own race rather than another one.In addition, there are those who comment on the many challenges that face such couples due to their different backgrounds and experiences. Bans against interracial marriage have occurred throughout history in other countries, such as South Africa, Canada and Australia.Even though such laws are no longer on the books, a number of major organizations work openly or behind the scenes on pro-racist goals and activities.The trend toward more interracial marriages is undoubtedly related, at least in part, to changing social norms.Our previous surveys have documented growing acceptance among the public.

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