Relative dating methods in archeology

Agribusiness: one that markets farm products and equipment, including warehousing, seed monopolization, and fertilizer.The corporatization of farming, resulting in a handful of very large non-local companies owning and managing--and in some cases ruining--millions of high-yield acres.Agriculture: large-scale cultivation of the land, with resulting specialization of labor, domestication of plants and animals, identification with one’s sedentery social group, and a radical separation from the natural world.The Agricultural (Neolithic) Revolution began ten thousand years ago in the Fertile Crescent, where extensive irrigation turned once-fertile croplands into barren salt pans.Because the life sciences messily overlap (that's life), terms from botany, biology, geology, chemistry, meteorology, and agriculture are included as well.Although designed for technical correctness and clarity, this glossary follows the practice in the Jung and Freud glossaries at this site of letting in a bit of humor here and there: for levity, for anecdote, and for an occasional thumb in the puritanical eye that closes itself to any information not dressed up in stiff, Latinized nomenclature (see the entry for English, Latinized). offer incentives for sealing off these unused wells.Animals: the animal kingdom branches into the deuterostomes (mouth and anus develop separately) and the protostomes.Animals are multicellular and possess mitochondria, a complex nervous system, and cells protected by a membrane and filled with complex organelles.

Ecofeminism and ecopsychology are mentioned, for example, as are terms from organic gardening and permaculture.Synthetic ammonia is a key component of artificial fertilizers.Analogue Forestry: a method for restoring ecosystems, developed from local Sri Lankan home gardens by the Neo-Synthesis Research Centre (NSRC), that seeks to bring back what grew there originally.Often has the effect of making the bed of a stream or flood plain rise.Also, a phase of forest biomass accumulation in the years that follow a harvest.

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